Fri, March 30, 2012

The Real Reason I Read Young Adult Literature

When you’re a grownup who spends an exorbitant amount of time reading and reviewing young adult novels and putting it out there for the whole world wide web to see, you’re certain to get asked one question time and time again:

“Why do you read books for teenagers?”

Most often, this is asked with an incredulous look, as if I’m slightly crazy for devoting so much time to this blog.

The most recent time around, it was one of my former HR managers who posed this question. My first thought when he told me he read my blog was: “Holy crap, did I post anything embarrassing this week?” Then, I prepared myself to give my stock response to the inevitable question. “So…why young adult books?”

“Well, I have made a pretty stellar career for myself, experienced some pretty ridiculous things, all because I’m a great reader and writer,” I said. “I wouldn’t be where I am today if I hadn’t been encouraged from a young age to read everything I could get my hands on. I want to pay back into that by promoting reading, especially to younger readers.”

It’s true. And sometimes I feel this SO PASSIONATELY I could burst.

But recently I realized that it’s so much more than that, if I’m being honest with myself.

This week, I’ve been really down in the dumps about this blog. In a recent switch to WordPress, I lost almost all my followers. My hits are down. After putting a few years of work into this, it’s really disheartening to feel like I’ve got to build things from the ground up.

And I’m going to Book Expo America again this year, which is so insanely cool and I feel so blessed to be able to attend. It’s an unbelievable opportunity. But I also find myself getting jealous of other bloggers who are invited to a cocktail party I’m not invited to. Or, honestly, those who get really cool ARCs.

It’s really stupid, I know, because my blog rocks and I know I’m awesome and none of the crap REALLY matters and none of it is why I write this blog. Not even remotely. But I can’t help but to feel like the unpopular kid from time to time.

Which is what finally got me thinking: THIS IS WHY I READ YA.

Yeah, I’m a grownup and I’m married and I have a great career. But sometimes I still feel as insecure as I did at 16. I have to deal with bullies at work sometimes, and there were mean girls at my old job, and I fight with my best friends, and I want to be pretty, and I want the boy I love to do nice sweet things for me, and sometimes I make the wrong decisions and question what I’m doing with my life.

How YA is that? It’s been almost 10 years since I’ve been a teenager (ack!), but I’m still struggling with the same issues, just in different ways. And just as YA novels are meant to help teens through these things, they help me too.

The struggles you face as a teenager are amplified times 1,000, of course, because you’re a kid and you have ALL THE HORMONES and every little thing is a huge deal. YA books get this, and they’re AMPLIFIED too, which is what I love about them. The “lessons” are easier to digest, and as a busy adult, I sort of crave that. And, frankly, a lot of these doubts stem from my adolescence, so why not get transported back to the age when it all began?

I still do this because I believe in the importance of spreading excitement about books. But, let’s be honest, I’m getting more out of this than I give. So I’m going to try to be more grateful, more thoughtful. And the next time I’m feeling down in the dumps? I’m gonna turn to a good book.

Anna Reads young adult book blog

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Posted by: Anna   •   In: me yes me
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69 Comments

  1. Tara said:

    You said it girl. I agree with everything you said on here, and I’m grateful we have each other to say, “Girl, get a grip,” because we all need a kick in the pants sometimes. XOXOXOXO and chin up – your blog rocks and YOU rock!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  2. jen said:

    anna, anna, anna…

    it takes balls to write something like this and if anyone would do it, it’d be you. this is so true, i want to climb on top of my house and scream it.

    ESPECIALLY the part about YA problems being easier to digest. there’s a beginning, a middle, a conflict, and a conclusion. DONE.

    can someone write the conclusions to all my conflicts and have that be the end of it, please?

    amazing post <3

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  3. Jennifer said:

    Fabulous post. Pretty much everything you said is why I read/write & love YA so much, too! Thanks for sharing 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  4. April books & wine said:

    Oh, Anna. I love this post and you.

    I will always be there to talk you down and to let your inner 16 year old girl know that she is kickass and totally sits at the cool table.

    <3

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  5. Ginger @ GReads! said:

    I think we all still have a teenager with doubts and insecurities living inside us. It’s those natural, human feelings that no matter what age our next birthday cake says.. they are still there! It’s just that as we age, we learn to manage them differently. I used to be embarrassed to admit to reading YA – but now? who cares! I love how personal you got in this post & how HONEST you are! I love every bit of you & I am so happy you love YA books as much as I do. It completes our friendship 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  6. Melissa said:

    I always feel weird when I’m at the library or bookstore and I’m in the YA section surrounded by teens. But I’d rather be reading what I like then not reading at all. I think since I want to eventually be a YA author it’s my research to read as much YA as I can. This is what I tell people when they ask, oh and because reading leads to learning new words which helps me on crossword puzzles lol. But seriously, some chicklit and adult fiction just doesn’t cut it for me. I’m not married with kids or divorced. I haven’t even completely started my career yet. So until they make a New Adult genre that has been talked about I’m kind of in limbo. I relate more to YA than adult fiction at the moment and as far as I’m concerned there’s nothing wrong with that. (Plus I love the YA blogging community!)

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  7. Dana said:

    oh i love this and i love you. “i know i’m awesome” is quite possibly my favorite thing about this post and about you. if it makes you feel any better, you’ve gotten me to read essentially ALL the books i’ve read in my adult life. (who cares if it’s all 3 of them?) THAT’S HUGE. lurrrrve you.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  8. Mandi Kaye said:

    I pondered this very question a few weeks ago. And I think you’re spot on. Age is just a number you know. There’s no magical number that sends you to the other side of the line and makes all of those angsty feelings go away. But we can always escape into a fabulous YA book and see how our favorite characters deal with them!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  9. Mallory said:

    I still follow you! Still love your blog and completely love this post. I agree with everything you said about why you read YA!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  10. Judy said:

    I’ve never thought about why I read YA books in quite that way before … but you’re absolutely right. I mean, I also read YA because the books are awesome, but there’s that other part too – the insecure, doubting, teenage girl inside who is looking for answers. Fantastic post!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  11. Hemborgwife said:

    I also mainly read YA right now which was triggered by the library I go to in Sweden having a better selection of that in English but I now love it as it gives me what I want from reading which is an escape from all the boring tedious adult tasks my life has!

    Looking forward to reading your reviews as a new reader and finding some new books!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  12. Victoria Scott said:

    Great post! I’m ‘favoriting’ it so I can reread it when I get this question…again and again and again. 😉

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  13. Em @ Sash & Em said:

    Seriously, Anna! This is why you’re so freaking lovable! This is such a great post, and I completely agree with you. Sometimes I feel like I grew up too fast, so being able to grab a book and get into the story and leave adulthood behind feels so great. Thank you tons for writing & posting this! You are amazing, girl. Never forget that!

    xoxo,
    Em

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  14. kit said:

    Great post! The busier and more “grown up” my life gets, the more I find myself turning to YA. Not only because there are some excellent and well written books out there, but I like to feed my inner teenager. 🙂 The YA books I read now are exactly the kind of books I would have loved to get my hands on growing up!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  15. Sash from Sash and Em said:

    <3 you so much. This post is why we're friends. 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  16. Karin said:

    Anna, you rock! I love your blog and I would plagarise all your posts because I love them so much. Thank you for this post. This is all so true and you summed it up so well.
    I love your blog and you are part of my daily bookish dose.
    Greetings from Austria,
    Karin

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  17. Melanie said:

    THIS!!!!

    And for the record, I always see you as one of the cool kids. But it’s nice to know that even the cool kids feel insecure about their blogs 😉

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  18. THETA SIGMA said:

    A well thought out and well presented piece.

    I’m a little (cough) more senior in age than you are and have only recently got into reading YA regularly.

    The reason why I like them are that they are intelligently written, does not patronise it’s intended readership, it provides life lessons for anyone of YA age upwards (stand up and take a bow John Green with “The Fault In Our Stars”), and it’s the genre that’s probably the most honest emotionally to its intended readership.

    So, in short, good for you for sticking up for YA books.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  19. Anne said:

    So I just wanted to say no matter what YOU think of yourself/your blogging, *I* think you’re awesome! I may not be great at commenting regularly, but I read pretty much everything you post through an RSS feed.

    Also, I totally agree with everything you said in this post. I would never have thought of it that way, but you’re so right!

    Anyway, lots of internet hugs! Feel better!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  20. Magan @ Rather Be Reading said:

    I <3 your face. Seriously. I think one of the reasons I read YA is because adults can be pompous asses and take themselves too seriously. There's so much I relate to in YA – or it takes me right back to how I felt in H.S.

    And girlllll don't worry about the hits on your blog. a) It looks fantastic and the new layout is pretty. *strokes screen* b) Things WILL build back up.

    I do feel you though. We're young and I *know* that, but I really need to put a block on my computer from checking stats.

    Don't let the YA haters get you down. xoxo

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  21. Meg said:

    You’re so right — there’s a little YA in all of us! Though we’ve all said (or heard) the phrase “high school never ends,” I’ve never really thought about how true it is. All those issues I dealt with as a teen have just morphed into things I deal with as an adult — just in different ways.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  22. Jac @ For Love and Books said:

    I think in some ways, I’m even more insecure as a 30 year old married mom than I was as a teen – so I love to read YA because it takes me back.

    Also, there is nothing that I love more than remembering what it was like to fall in love for the very first time, and YA so often does that for me!

    (The biggest pain about switching to wordpress was that I lost nearly all my followers as well, I wished there had been a better way to keep them.)

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  23. We Heart YA said:

    +1. Like. Retweet!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  24. kimba88 said:

    I read books from all genres and recently began reading YA..i love some of the books in this market..Divergent, Partials, Cinder, Everneath…you do not have to feel insecure to read it, although i am sorry you doubt yourself..be proud of all you have accomplished 🙂 I wish there were no labels on books..too many people get stuck in a genre/category rut and miss so many wonderful authors and books. Thanks for sharing your lovely thoughts. Enjoy BEA..i hope to go next year!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  25. Jillian said:

    Beauiful post. 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  26. Jane said:

    Your blog is awesome! I love coming here and getting ideas for what to read next. You actually got me interested in The Selection and I scored an ARC this past week… and devoured it in a day. I’m impatiently waiting for the next one… and to see if the pilot gets picked up.

    And I too am a young adult reader, and I will continue to do so because I’m just a child at heart 😉

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  27. LitzaLou said:

    I adore this post. I used to be embarrassed about reading YA (and MG, too), but then I realized it’s really not a big deal. I enjoy reading YA. I do. There’s absolutely nothing to be embarrassed about, even though I haven’t been a teenager in a long time. Thanks so much for your post! It’s exactly how I feel.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  28. ELLEN said:

    I love your article and your blog. I adore YA books and it has been “many moons” since I was a teenager, LOL, but there is just someting about them that I relate to.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  29. Erin said:

    Annika, I love this post and we should drink wine and talk about this some more 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  30. Liz said:

    I think you really hit the nail on the head with this one. We all deal with the emotions that characters in YA novels are faced with–they’re just dealing with them for the first time. I think sometimes adulthood can be so tough that makes us feel like we’re in the shoes of a teenager again.

    I really admire you for sharing this. It can be hard to admit that one doesn’t always feel as together as one might appear, and that’s okay. Let it be said that you are stuck with me as a follower.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  31. Jennifer aka YA Book Nerd said:

    Yes, Yes, a million times yes! I love the idea of “firsts” for teen novels. As an adult, you don’t get many firsts anymore.

    PS. I adore your blog and read it daily 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  32. Kelsey @ The Lost Book Reports said:

    Pretty much one of the best summarizations about reading YA, I have read. I am sorry you are feeling down in the dumps.. But I get it. = )

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  33. Kristilyn (Reading in Winter) said:

    Great post! I always think that life is just one big high school … regardless of what age we are, there’s always going to be ups and downs, we’re going to worry about the little things, we’re going to have moments of insecurity and doubt … it’s nice to read books that I can relate to! YA books just make me feel good. They’re about real issues and incorporate love, laughs, and real-life situations. They’re wonderful!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  34. Julie Seifert said:

    Great post. I can only heartily agree.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  35. Jen (LostintheLibrary) said:

    You are a million times amazing and seriously yours is one of my most favourite blogs. You are passionate, talented and creative. Thank you for being so open and honest, know that you are not alone. I often feel like the kid sitting alone in the cafeteria -on the outside looking in and it’s been 20 years since I was a teen (OMG-thats scary)
    Always here if you need to chat:)

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  36. DISCUSSION: The Beauty of Books (And Why It’s OK to Read YA) « Reading in Winter said:

    […] @ Anna Reads –> The Real Reason I Read Young Adult Literature Erica @ The Book Cellar –>  The “YA” […]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  37. margie c {the bumble girl} said:

    Your post really hit home, people ask me this question all the time – why a old 30-something mom of 2 likes to read YA books all the time? I usually answer with “because I can!” lol! but your post is beautiful and right to the point. Thank you for putting yourself out there 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  38. PinkpolkadotMichelle said:

    Love this post!! I feel the same way about YA books… I used to feel silly standing in the YA section at the library or barnes & nobles, but when I joined goodreads I realized there are tons of adults who love YA and only YA!
    I often wonder why I like those type of books, and I honestly really don’t know, but somewhere in me I must relate to teens better than to adults with real-life problems (work, kids, money, marriage). I love your blog, so don’t be down on yourself, youre doing good stuff!!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  39. Lynn said:

    Brilliant post. That is all.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  40. reut said:

    this is beautiful, Anna. thank you.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  41. Sarah @ StoryboundGirl said:

    YES x 10000000. Well said.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  42. Never Too Fond of Books » Weekly Wrap-Up 3.30.12 said:

    […] The Real Reason I Read Young Adult Literature – Anna explains why she reads YA. […]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  43. VeganYANerds said:

    Great post, Anna. I feel like there are more adults than teens reading YA these days and while I’m sure there are some people who think we’re silly, that’s ok because who cares what they think?

    There’ll always be people who get things we don’t or get great opportunities that we miss out on but then again, we also get things that people miss out on too. There’s always someone better and worse of than us 😉

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  44. Chloe (YA Booklover Blog) said:

    Awesome, awesome, awesome post! I’m a teen and I run a book blog and I read YA books all the time. I totally get what you mean with everything here! Especially the jealousy thing. I think it happens to all of us, you know? Keep up the good work 😀

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  45. a. knight said:

    I can only imagine how difficult adult life is, but I will agree with you that all the hormones do crazy things to us in crazy situations. Which is why I like reading about what other people like me would do. YA is amazing, pure fun. And I understand your feelings, Anna. Cheer up!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  46. hannah said:

    This is such a great post, Anna! I’ve been a follower for a while, but this is actually my first time commenting. I couldn’t resist telling you how much I enjoyed your words. You hit the nail right on the head! No matter what age we are, the insecurity you first feel and notice as a teenager never completely goes away. And when things go wrong, your adult self has to respond like an adult. But that slightly dramatic teenage heart still exists. I can’t think of anything better than a living a little vicariously through the characters in a young adult novel. And AMEN to spreading the love of reading. I don’t care what books people prefer – I’m just happy they’re reading period. Keep spreading the literary love 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  47. Annette said:

    I know I read YA because I want to get teens turned on to books.But you have made me want to ponder if there’s more to this… I haven’t anything profound yet, but I’ll let you know.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  48. kim reads said:

    I just LOVE your blog Anna and I especially love this post. Thanks for helping me put into words how I feel about YA. There is so much bad scary grown up stuff to worry about, YA helps us find a place to forget about all that and see how small our problems can be again.
    Thanks for your AMAZING Blog!
    Kim M.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  49. Lisa said:

    You have a great blog, a unique voice, and a perspective I adore. Read on, my friend.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  50. nea barabea said:

    Anna, seriously, you ROCK!! That’s all I wanted to say 🙂

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  51. heidi said:

    Anna, I’ve been really sorry to see your frustrations on Twitter with your transfer to WordPress. But I’m SO happy to see you write this post which is so incredibly heartfelt and true it makes me cheer. You’re awesome, I DO think your blog looks so much nicer now, I’m sure you’ll get the readers back, and the reasons you read YA? I think you managed to put into words exactly how I feel about the genre. Cheers!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  52. Lisa @ Read.Breathe.Relax. said:

    Thanks for this post, Anna. I can’t image how tough it must be to go through that transition. If it’s any consolation, I think moving to WordPress was a great move to make in the long run.

    I’ll also be at Book Expo America this year and I would LOVE to meet you! As a side note, I didn’t get invited to ANY cocktail parties, so…no worries. 😉

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  53. Jasmine Rose said:

    I just wanted to let you know that not only is this post amazing, so are you <3

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  54. Ashley @ ashley loves books said:

    You know how much I love and am devoted to your blog, no matter where it goes. I’m sorry and sad to see your frustrations with the recent switch, but I hope you know how awesome and important you are to YA blogging. You’re the reason I started, and when I made that post during the Love-A-Thon I cannot even tell you how many responses I had from people who echoed my thoughts. This is a phenomenal post about YA and how it’s just so much more than the Young Adult community – it’s life and emotion and there isn’t a single reason any of us should be judged for it. I usually fumble when people ask me why I read for teens, but I’ve definitely got a solid answer now!

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  55. Elizabeth @ TatteredSpines said:

    Totally agree! Just finished writing a 7 pg paper for my Children’s Lit class on the importance of children’s literature in which I started my paper with this example:
    “My concentration in what I read, and what I intend to write, is young adult literature. A large part of this choice is because I feel that young adult literature has more interesting plot lines than adult literature. Adults have already been through the experiences that children and young adults experience for the first time and there are limited directions the plot lines can go. However, young adult literature has a wide scope of topics to cover. First love, first heartbreak. First kiss, first sexual experience. Discovering their sexuality, discovering their own bodies. Dealing with divorce, broken families, new families. New siblings, half siblings, step siblings. The darker sides of abuse, rape, drugs, and gangs. “Young adult” is the time in a person’s life when they define their personalities, their morals, and the values that intrinsically make them who they are for the rest of their lives. It is the time of transition and change. “

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  56. Jamie said:

    “It’s really stupid, I know, because my blog rocks and I know I’m awesome and none of the crap REALLY matters and none of it is why I write this blog. Not even remotely. But I can’t help but to feel like the unpopular kid from time to time.

    Which is what finally got me thinking: THIS IS WHY I READ YA.

    Yeah, I’m a grownup and I’m married and I have a great career. But sometimes I still feel as insecure as I did at 16. I have to deal with bullies at work sometimes, and there were mean girls at my old job, and I fight with my best friends, and I want to be pretty, and I want the boy I love to do nice sweet things for me, and sometimes I make the wrong decisions and question what I’m doing with my life.”

    ALL OF THIS. YES. I feel like this all the time…in life and in blogging especially. We’ve talked about this a lot but YES I feel you on those feelings and this is exactly why I read YA.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  57. Kim said:

    Great post! I love reading YA too for all the reasons you do.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  58. Amy said:

    One reason I read YA novels is that I can be pretty sure I won’t be slapped in the face (or the ear, via audiobooks) with gratuitous sex and/or violence. I can simply enjoy the story without worrying about when I might come across something I really didn’t want to hear.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

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    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  60. Puctimmidsfum said:

    Why bother when the answer is here answer here

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  61. Cassie said:

    Nicely stated. It’s not like we weren’t all teenagers once.

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  62. Melissa @ Writer Grrl Reads said:

    I don’t think that I was following your blog yet when you originally posted this, as I’m sure I would have left a comment earlier if I had! I clicked on the link from your end-of-the-year survey and totally just had to say YES YES YES to everything that you wrote here. YA literature means the same to me, and I totally understand how life can still feel teenage angsty sometimes, even though we’re supposed to be “grown-ups.” I’m pregnant with my first child at the moment, and have had some CRAZY emotional days, where I can’t stop crying and I don’t even know why. It’s like being a hormonal teenager all over again, except that now I have the rational thinking of an adult tacked onto the hormones, so that I can clearly look at myself and realize that I’m being an idiot for bawling at work, yet that makes my cry more because I can’t help it. (And I’m not totally nutty depressed, don’t worry — my hubby’s been great and supportive and brings me cookies as needed!) So I just wanted to say thank you for your honesty in writing this post… it meant a lot to me. I’m a new fan of yours, but definitely a die-hard fan now! (Sorry if that sounds creepy!)

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  63. Estelle: 2012 End of the Year Survey (Yay!) said:

    […] → Anna of Anna Reads sounds off in a fantastic post about adults reading YA books. […]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  64. #boutofbooks Day 2 The Daily Bookmark said:

    […] or Young-Adult? Young-adult, though I do read some adult novels. Read this post for why I prefer YA. Anna writes it in a way that makes perfect sense that I could never hope to […]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  65. Sash: Why I’ve Been Reading Adult Books » Sash and Em: A Tale of Two Bookies said:

    […] outgrown YA? Heck, no! I love YA! I whole-heartedly agree with my friend Anna when she talks about the reasons that she reads Young Adult literature even as a mid 20′s married woman. The issues in YA books are still relevant to me today as a […]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  66. Armchair BEA: Keeping it Real & YA said:

    […] for why I still read YA? It was actually when Anna from Anna Reads laid it all on the line, in a beautiful and succinct way, that I truly recognized why I read […]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  67. Kelsey said:

    I can completely understand what it means for you. YA is empowering! It’s intense! This is a wonderful post, Anna! (:

    [Reply]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  68. Why YA? | Matched Manuscripts: Reviews and Recommendations said:

    […] read a great explanation of why adults read YA (young adult literature) at Anna Reads earlier this week, and while I agree with her assessment that YA makes readers, young and old, feel […]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

  69. Expanding Empathy – Unexpected Benefits of Reading YA as an Adult | Oh, the Books! said:

    […] adults reading YA novels, why we do it, whether it’s a good thing or a bad thing, and so on forever and ever. Today, though, I’m hoping to broach the topic from a slightly different perspective […]

    Posted on: Fri, March 30, 2012

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